Archive | April, 2011

The Dickens Tavern: Home to the Smoked Pork and Pickled Pepper Sandwich

27 Apr

We love this review from seriouseats.com – the site has promised to try a sandwich a day, and this creation sounds particularly delectable! Are any of our readers from this area of Colorado?

If you want to see the article in its original location, and read more about its other sandwich reviews, click here. It’s a fun site!

Here’s their review of the Smoked Pork Sandwich!

A Sandwich a Day: Smoked Pork at the Dickens Tavern in Longmont, CO

Posted by dbcurrie, April 27, 2011 at 11:30 AM

In this great country of ours, one could eat a different sandwich every day of the year—so that’s what we’ll do. Here’s A Sandwich a Day, our daily look at sandwiches around the country. Got a sandwich we should check out? Let us know. —The Mgmt.

The Smoked Pork & Pickled Pepper Sandwich at Dickens Tavern

The building that houses the Dickens Tavern in Longmont, Colorado, was built in 1881 by William Henry Dickens, a relative of the writer Charles Dickens. Upstairs from the Tavern is the Dickens Opera House, a music venue. Inside the walls (allegedly) are ghosts. But enough history.

The smoked pork and pickled pepper sandwich ($9) at the Dickens Tavern isn’t the prettiest girl at the dance, but looks are deceiving. The menu describes it as “smoked pork, pickles, hot peppers, melted cheese, all grilled on super toast with chipotle aioli,” but it looks a lot plainer than that.

In fact, it looks like shredded meat with cheese sauce on a large slice of bread. One bite, though, tells a different tale. There’s the smokiness of barbecue followed by the heat of peppers, the creaminess of cheese and aioli, and more smokiness from the chipotle.

I had to peek inside the sandwich to see where all the flavor was coming from, but no, there was nothing hiding, It looked like shredded meat with a melty cheesy sauce and bits of green that must have been the pickled peppers.

Sandwiches at the Dickens Tavern are served with skinny fries; this one came with a pickle spear, too. You can substitute salad for the fries for no extra charge, or opt for soup or onion rings for a buck, or sweet potato wedges for an extra $2.

Dickens Tavern
300 Main Street, Longmont CO (map); 303-834-9384

About the author: Donna Currie has been cooking for fun and writing for pay since the days when typewritten articles traveled by snail mail. When she combined those talents in a food column for a newspaper in her area, she realized that writing about food is almost as much fun as eating. You can find her on her blog, Cookistry or follow her on Twitter at @dbcurrie.

Dickens Tavern: Home of the Smoked Pork and Pickled Pepper Sandwich

27 Apr

We love this review from seriouseats.com – the site has promised to try a sandwich a day, and this creation sounds particularly delectable! Are any of our readers from this area of Colorado?

If you want to see the article in its original location, and read more about its other sandwich reviews, click here. It’s a fun site!

Here’s their review of the Smoked Pork Sandwich!

A Sandwich a Day: Smoked Pork at the Dickens Tavern in Longmont, CO

Posted by dbcurrie, April 27, 2011 at 11:30 AM

In this great country of ours, one could eat a different sandwich every day of the year—so that’s what we’ll do. Here’s A Sandwich a Day, our daily look at sandwiches around the country. Got a sandwich we should check out? Let us know. —The Mgmt.

The Smoked Pork & Pickled Pepper Sandwich at Dickens Tavern

The building that houses the Dickens Tavern in Longmont, Colorado, was built in 1881 by William Henry Dickens, a relative of the writer Charles Dickens. Upstairs from the Tavern is the Dickens Opera House, a music venue. Inside the walls (allegedly) are ghosts. But enough history.

The smoked pork and pickled pepper sandwich ($9) at the Dickens Tavern isn’t the prettiest girl at the dance, but looks are deceiving. The menu describes it as “smoked pork, pickles, hot peppers, melted cheese, all grilled on super toast with chipotle aioli,” but it looks a lot plainer than that.

In fact, it looks like shredded meat with cheese sauce on a large slice of bread. One bite, though, tells a different tale. There’s the smokiness of barbecue followed by the heat of peppers, the creaminess of cheese and aioli, and more smokiness from the chipotle.

I had to peek inside the sandwich to see where all the flavor was coming from, but no, there was nothing hiding, It looked like shredded meat with a melty cheesy sauce and bits of green that must have been the pickled peppers.

Sandwiches at the Dickens Tavern are served with skinny fries; this one came with a pickle spear, too. You can substitute salad for the fries for no extra charge, or opt for soup or onion rings for a buck, or sweet potato wedges for an extra $2.

Dickens Tavern
300 Main Street, Longmont CO (map); 303-834-9384

About the author: Donna Currie has been cooking for fun and writing for pay since the days when typewritten articles traveled by snail mail. When she combined those talents in a food column for a newspaper in her area, she realized that writing about food is almost as much fun as eating. You can find her on her blog, Cookistry or follow her on Twitter at @dbcurrie.

Traditional Easter Foods

22 Apr

Easter weekend is upon us! What foods will your family be cooking or buying to make the holiday special? We’ve got a list of some traditional Easter foods below, along with a description and some background information. We hope you enjoy learning more about where your traditional culinary fare comes from – and perhaps you’ll be inspired to try something new this year. Have a wonderful Easter weekend!

We are reposting the following information from about.com – follow the link to read the original article!

Traditional Easter Foods

Although colored hard-boiled eggs are probably the first Easter food to come to mind, other foods factor into the traditional Easter meals around the world.

Hot Cross Buns are an Easter favorite in many areas. The tradition allegedly is derived from ancient Anglo-Saxons who baked small wheat cakes in honor of the springtime goddess, Eostre. After converting to Christianity, the church substituted the cakes with sweetbreads blessed by the church.

Countries around the world serve sweet cakes in the same vein, such as Czech babobka and Polish baba. The Greeks and Portugese serve round, flat loaves marked with a cross and decorated with Easter eggs. Syrian and Jordanian Christians have honey pastries.
Pretzels were first shaped to indicate the torso of a person with arms folded, praying.

The roast lamb dinner that many eat on Easter Sunday goes back earlier than Easter to the first Passover of the Jewish people. The sacrificial lamb was roasted and eaten, together with unleavened bread and bitter herbs (see Passover Seder) in hopes that the angel of God would pass over their homes and bring no harm. As Hebrews converted to Christianity, they naturally brought along their traditions with them. The Christians often refer to Jesus as The Lamb of God. Thus, the traditions merged.

In the United States, ham is a traditional Easter food. In the early days, meat was slaughtered in the fall. There was no refrigeration, and the fresh pork that wasn’t consumed during the winter months before Lent was cured for spring. The curing process took a long time, and the first hams were ready around the time Easter rolled around. Thus, ham was a natural choice for the celebratory Easter dinner.

What will you be serving this weekend?

Happy Easter!

-The DineLocal team

Women Are Owning the Restaurant Industry!

13 Apr

Did you know that Nearly half of all Americans have worked in the restaurant industry at some point in their lives? Or that one in four adults had their first job experience in a restaurant? How about the fact that nearly 50% of restaurants are now owned by women?

The restaurant industry has historically had a very important social and economic role -within communities, and also worldwide – and new research is bringing some fascinating findings to light. Check out the National Restaurant Association’s detailed stats below…

New Research Report Shows Nearly 50% of Restaurants are Women Owned

National Restaurant Association Number of Minority Managers in Restaurants on the Increase

New research from the National Restaurant Association shows that nearly 50 percent of restaurants are now owned by women.
The research also shows that restaurants employ more minority managers than any other industry, and that Hispanic restaurant ownership has increased 42 percent in the past five years.

“As the second largest private sector employer in the country, the restaurant industry continues to provide opportunity for millions of individuals from all backgrounds who strive to achieve the American dream,” said Scott DeFife, Executive Vice President for Policy and Government Affairs at the National Restaurant Association. “The numbers are impressive – more women and individuals of diverse backgrounds are becoming restaurant entrepreneurs, or are pursuing lifelong, successful careers in the industry.”

The National Restaurant Association recently launched its “America Works Here” campaign, a year-long advertising campaign that will highlight some of the industry’s most impactful statistics and tell “chapters” in the restaurant industry’s story. The first ad, launched in January, highlights the 13 million jobs created by restaurants, and the more than $1.7 trillion the industry added to the economy.

Nearly half of all Americans have worked in the restaurant industry at some point in their lives, and more than one in four adults had their first job experience in a restaurant. Eighty percent of restaurant managers got their start as front-line employees. Restaurants are primarily small businesses – 93 percent have fewer than 50 employees.

“Many lawmakers may not know that America’s restaurants run on an average profit margin of three to four percent,” said DeFife. “It is critical that there is a commitment in Congress and in state capitols to a pro-business climate that helps America’s restaurants continue to be an engine of economic and job growth.”

The Skinny on What’s Trending in Drinks

8 Apr

We don’t know about you, but we’re already looking forward to the warm days ahead. Despite some chilly weather, it is finally starting to feel like spring is in the air. We’ve got wining, dining, and sun in mind! And luckily for the health conscious, ‘Skinny Cocktails’ are in season. The Ink Foundry gives us the lowdown on who’s serving what.

Read on to find out more, and head over to their site to see the article in its original location: inkfoundry.com. Enjoy!

 

The Skinny on what’s Trending in Drinks at Restaurants and Bars

By Carina Ost

Good news, we are in 2011, prediction time is over and it is time to see what’s really trending. Low calorie options on menus or calorie content exposed is nothing new, but what is new is where that trend is spilling. Hint: look to what’s on top of your coaster or cocktail napkin.

While the nation is experiencing a cocktail explosion many Americans’ waistlines are expanding. For many diners the question becomes: cocktail or dessert? With the rise and reintroduction of so many interesting prohibition and artisanal cocktails who wants to just try one, there must be a better solution.

The first time many of us heard of the cocktail trend known as “Skinny Cocktails” was from Bethenny Frankel from The Real Housewives of New York City. She introduced us all to her Skinnygirl Margarita product and the world of 100 calorie cocktails was unleashed.

It is really no surprise, beers have become more calorie conscious in recent years. In fact, Miller Genuine Draft 64 clocks in with only 64 calories. With the average margarita containing upwards of 400 calories, a change was necessary.

On the retail side, alcohol is getting healthier. No lie. Liquor like VeeV, contain that magical fruit açaí, which has 57% more antioxidants than that other superfruit, pomegranates.

Agave nectar that was once only used for tequila production is now a readily used sweetener that is 1.6 times sweeter than honey, so you can use less and intake fewer calories. Vegans, diabetics, and nutritionists use it as a healthy subsitute for honey, sugar, and artificial sweeteners. Since the sweetener is a thin liquid, not viscous, it is an easy and healthy add-in to beverages from iced tea to Long Island iced teas. Expect more bartenders to shake with this sweet ingredient.

Since cocktails are part of the girls’ night out and dining out experience, what are the restaurants doing to give the people what they want: cool cocktails with low calories?

The Cheescake Factory, a place known for enormous portions, is rolling out a menu of five of their most popular cocktails in skinny versions with around half of the calories. Margaritas and mojitos that normally contain 300 calories now have 150 calories. Starting in March this slimmed down version of the drink menu will be available in all of their locations.

Fleming’s Prime Steakhouse & Wine Bar is serving up a cocktail called Tickled Pink, which clocks in at 99 calories, it is known as the skinniest of the skinny cocktails. This drink with Belvedere Vodka, sugar-raspberry preserves, and Mionetto Prosecco doesn’t leave us feeling like we are missing anything.

Z’Tejas Southwestern Grill has a “Naturally Skinny” cocktail line that features six cocktails that include  Veev alcohol, agave nectar, cucumber and much more. The drinks range from a Lemon Skinny Deep to an Açaí Basil Gimlet, all with less than 250 calories.

The only problem with this trend is that with half the calories we are all hoping for half the price. Unfortunately, that is just not the case. Although the Tickled Pink from Fleming’s is offered on their “5 For 6 ‘Til 7″ happy hour menu so you can grab it for $6 between 5pm-7pm every night of the week.

Cheers to skinny cocktails!

How To Attract Culinary Tourists To Your Restaurant

5 Apr

In this edition of The Advice Guy, Jonathan Deutsch, Ph.D., associate professor of culinary arts at Kingsborough Community College, CUNY and public health at the CUNY Graduate Center, answers a question about culinary tourism. Follow the link at the bottom of the article to learn more about culinary tourism, and drop us a comment at the bottom of this page with your own thoughts on attracting tourists to your restaurant!

[See original article at Monkeydish.com]

“We are known as an ethnic neighborhood restaurant. What can I do to attract culinary tourists?”

-Liliana Ramos, Owner, Los Mariachis, Brooklyn, NY

“Culinary tourism” can mean a variety of things. Lucy Long, editor of the book Culinary Tourism gives examples ranging from going on a food and wine tour of a region, to sampling a cuisine from far away in a local restaurant, to structuring a vacation around a cooking class.  What these experiences have in common is a quest for an authentic interaction with another culture through food, a unique and memorable experience.

Long suggests several ways of presenting the restaurant experience in ways that will “stir curiosity and attract customers.  First, if the food is a type that is unfamiliar to the targeted clientele, it needs to be presented as both edible and palatable.  That can be done by using several strategies: framing it as tasty food; describing it in a tasty way; juxtaposing it with familiar foods; explaining what it is; changing ingredients to be more familiar to those customers. These strategies help customers feel ‘safe’ trying new foods. Also, though, if the food is a type that’s already familiar, it can be ‘exoticized’ in similar ways—explaining or describing the history behind it, its meanings and uses within its own culture; [and] presenting it in an artistic way.”

Often culinary tourists just “discover” your place—someone happens upon you, has a phenomenal experience, and blogs, tweets, posts, and just plain talks about their experience. That’s great!

Even if that discovery does not happen naturally, you can plant the seeds for culinary tourists to find you and fall in love with your restaurant:

  • Go online. Culinary tourists hang out on the web sharing their finds and debating the virtues of one another’s favorites. Try forums on chow.com, seriouseats.com and local sites like citysearch.com. Let readers know about you and encourage your regulars to post reviews.
  • Emphasize a high margin signature item. Culinary tourists often focus on finding “the best” example of a favorite food.  Promote positive reviews of a signature item and highlight it on the menu. A trek in search of “the best taco ever” may resonatewith culinary tourists more than a trip to a good Mexican restaurant.
  • Market to tour operators and partner with competitors. In terms of formal culinary tourism, hold a tasting for tour guides and collaborate with other operations to form ready-to-market experiences like a dine around, crawl, or series of short talks and tastings.

More on culinary tourism here.