Archive | December, 2011

What Comes After Christmas?

19 Dec

Christmas can be an all-consuming endeavor: friends, family, food, festivities, music, presents — so much so, in fact, that we often forget to look ahead to the days following this special season.

In case you’ve forgotten, New Years Eve celebrations are right around the corner! If you haven’t decided what to do and are looking for a few good dining options in the ‘Burgh, check out Table Magazine’s recent piece on “Where to go and what to eat” while you ring in the new year.

Got suggestions? Comment and let us know!

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New Year’s Eve 2011
Where to go and what to eat!
Posted: Dec. 19, 2011
By Jessie Cadle

New Years Eve is the time to don the fancy dress and the highest (and hottest) heels to hit the city. But it’s also a holiday for fabulous, filling food. We’ve scoured the streets and found restaurants with special New Year’s Eve events. Grab a fork!

Have a little dessert before dinner at Dozen Bake Shop, in Lawrenceville and Oakland. They have cupcakes with liquor in the frosting or in the cake. Pick up a few margarita, cosmo or jack and coke cupcakes for yourself or to take to your New Year’s party. (Cheers!)

Head to Highland Park for E2’s family style dinner—featuring a special menu created by Chef Kate Romane—for $60 per person. It’s BYOB, so don’t forget the Champagne!

If you want a full-night affair, head to Seven Springs for one of two parties: the Foggy Goggle for $50 a person or the Matterhorn Lounge and Alpine Room Party for $25 per person. Both feature hors d’oeuvres from 9-11 p.m., DJ performances, and pork and sauerkraut at midnight.

If you’re down for even more of a road trip, head to Green House Tavern in Cleveland, Ohio. We fell in love with this place on a recent culinary trip. For $89, you can have a 9-course dinner menu (vegetarian available) and a show by three different DJs.

SAVOY is bringing in Celebrity DJ Biz Markie for their $100 event, which includes a three-course menu, complimentary wine, and a Champagne toast. For $50, you can hang in the lounge for a more laid-back celebration.

Spoon, in East Liberty, is celebrating with a small two-course meal—including chicken and dumplings or filet and crab bread pudding—and dessert. But, if you’re out in Allison Park, check out Blue’s New Year’s Eve menu and New Orleans style jazz by The Southern Comfort Band from 8 p.m. until midnight.

For a classic downtown Pittsburgh night, go to Braddock’s American Brasserie for $50 a person. The special menu includes prosciutto wrapped scallop galantine. (Yum.) Or check out Habitat, for $100 per person, for a six-course meal, featuring scallops and seared duck breast.

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Follow this link to read the rest of this article on Table Magazine’s website.

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Get Ready for… Christmas Cookies!

7 Dec

No holiday celebration is complete without a plate (or several) of traditional Christmas cookies. We consulted Good Housekeeping for a few good recipes. Below is our favorite – simple, old-fashioned sugar cookies. Visit the site to check out more delicious creations!

Old-Fashioned Classics: 11 Traditional Christmas Cookies

Baking cookies is a wonderful holiday tradition, and there are a few yummy treats you must have on the plate of Christmas cookies every year: decorated sugar cookies, thumbprints, gingerbread cookies. We’ve got the perfect recipes for these cookies — and for your other favorite classics. Let the baking begin!

Sugar Cookies

From Good Housekeeping

triple-tested at the Good Housekeeping Research Institute

Sugar cookies are the ideal holiday cookie — they can be frosted and dressed up in countless ways to suit any occasion.

Preheat oven to 350 degrees F. In large bowl, with mixer on low speed, beat butter and sugar until blended. Increase speed to high; beat until light and creamy. On low speed, beat in egg and vanilla. Beat in flour, baking powder, and salt until blended.

Divide dough into 4 equal pieces; flatten each piece into a disk. Wrap each disk with plastic wrap and refrigerate 1 hour or until dough is firm enough to roll. (Or place dough in freezer 30 minutes.)

On lightly floured surface, with floured rolling pin, roll 1 piece of dough 1/8 inch thick. With floured 3-inch to 4-inch cookie cutters, cut dough into as many cookies as possible; wrap and refrigerate trimmings. Place cookies, 1 inch apart, on ungreased large cookie sheet.

Bake cookies 10 to 12 minutes or until lightly browned. Transfer cookies to wire rack to cool. Repeat with remaining dough and trimmings.

When cookies are cool, prepare Ornamental Frosting, if you like; use along with sugars and candies to decorate cookies. Set cookies aside to allow frosting to dry completely, about 1 hour. Store in tightly covered container (with waxed paper between layers if decorated) at room temperature up to 2 weeks, or in freezer up to 3 months.

See more scrumptious holiday recipes at delish.com~