Tag Archives: Waste

WikiPearls: the future of ice cream?

24 Jul

WikiPearls

Just found a fascinating article from TheKitchn.com about a brand new frozen treat called ”WikiPearls.”These little treats consist of your standard ice cream, but wrapped inside a flavorful skin. They won’t melt all over you and make a mess, and they are positively delicious. Is this where ice cream is headed in the future? Here’s what The Kitchn had to say:

“The ice cream comes in three flavors: mango ice cream with coconut skin, chocolate ice cream with hazelnut skin, and vanilla ice cream with peanut skin. Currently you can only get WikiPearls at the WikiBar in Paris.

The masterminds behind the protective membrane, Harvard professor David Edwards and French designer Francois Azambourg, say the purpose of these protective skins, or WikiCells, is to reduce waste and improve the consumer’s health through vitamin-supplemented skins and portion control. One ice cream ball has only 50 calories.”

Check out the rest of the article here, and let us know what you think of this new sweet treat!

British Retailers Turn Fish Heads Into Energy

20 Jun

Most people pitch the ‘gross’ leftover food scraps they don’t use for cooking. But in England, retailers are trying to change that practice. Chicken fat, fish heads, and leftover sandwiches are just a few of the scraps being carted off to biogas plants so they can be reused as an energy source. As business owners become more environmentally conscious, this new role for discarded food comes right on time.

Bloomberg news reports on the latest developments – read the whole article and learn more by following this link to the article on their website.

British Retailers Turn Waste Into Power

By on June 14, 2012

Bloomberg News

John Montagu, the Fourth Earl of Sandwich, likely never had an inkling that his culinary invention would revolutionize lunchtime. And it’s certain that he never dreamed that a cheddar ploughmans or an egg and cress would one day serve to heat British homes in wintertime.

Tesco (TSCO), Britain’s biggest supermarket chain, along with Marks & Spencer Group (MKS), John Lewis Partnership’s Waitrose, Wal-Mart’s (WMT) Asda unit, and J Sainsbury (SBRY), are carting off chicken fat, fish heads, and leftover sandwiches to biogas plants for conversion into electricity. For many British retailers, the new waste management dovetails with environmental aims. M&S announced this month that it had achieved its five-year objective of becoming “carbon neutral”—a goal many of its competitors share..

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